Singapore Sets Out Maritime Decarbonisation Ambitions

Singapore has set out its ambitions for maritime decarbonisation and will commit at least SGD300m ($220.4m) in additional funding.



The Maritime Singapore Decarbonisation Blueprint: Working Towards 2050 was unveiled on Wednesday to chart concrete, long term strategies to develop a sustainable maritime sector.


The blueprint outlines seven key areas that will be focused on by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) with at least SGD300m in additional funding for the initiatives in the blueprint.


For vessels flying the Singapore flag under the Singapore Registry of Ships (SRS) there will be incentives for owners to operate green ships.


A green notation was introduced for vessels under the SRS in November last year.


Further incentives will aim to working towards 50% of the Singapore-flag fleet being green ships by 2050. It’s understood the exact definition of a green ship is still being discussed.


As the world’s largest bunkering port Singapore is looking towards a multi-fuel future and developing bunkering standards and infrastructure for this.


It will include supplying low and zero-carbon marine fuels including biofuels, methanol, ammonia, and potentially hydrogen, while enabling green technologies such as carbon capture, storage and utilisation.


The Maritime Singapore Decarbonisation Blueprint: Working Towards 2050 was unveiled on Wednesday to chart concrete, long term strategies to develop a sustainable maritime sector.


The blueprint outlines seven key areas that will be focused on by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) with at least SGD300m in additional funding for the initiatives in the blueprint.


For vessels flying the Singapore flag under the Singapore Registry of Ships (SRS) there will be incentives for owners to operate green ships.


A green notation was introduced for vessels under the SRS in November last year.


Further incentives will aim to working towards 50% of the Singapore-flag fleet being green ships by 2050. It’s understood the exact definition of a green ship is still being discussed.


As the world’s largest bunkering port Singapore is looking towards a multi-fuel future and developing bunkering standards and infrastructure for this.


It will include supplying low and zero-carbon marine fuels including biofuels, methanol, ammonia, and potentially hydrogen, while enabling green technologies such as carbon capture, storage and utilisation.


Singapore operates the world’s second largest container port, and biggest transhipment hub, and has set targets for a low and zero carbon future.


It is aimed to have a 60% reduction in emissions over 2005 levels by 2030, and zero emissions from port operations by 2050.


Domestic harbour craft will all need to operate on low-carbon energy solutions by 2030 and full electric power and net zero fuels by 2050.


Singapore aims to be a global hub for maritime decarbonisation R&D. Last year the Global Centre for Maritime Decarbonisation (GCMD) was set-up jointly by the MPA and six founding industry partners.


Singapore would also aim to become a green finance hub, including accounting and reporting.

Source: Seatrade Maritime News

22 views0 comments